Psychological Perspectives,

Assignment Overview (Modules 1-4)
The directions for the assignments for the next few weeks are a bit confusing? so let me see if I can help clarify a little. The ultimate goal (due at the end of Module 4) is to prepare a synthesis paper that integrates the common themes and ideas from each of the assigned article readings into a single, cohesive paper. To get to this goal, you will bring together the pieces that you build over the next few weeks?the challenge for Module 2 (this week) is that you need to look ahead to the upcoming readings so that you can build an outline of common themes. You do NOT need to read the complete articles for the Module 3 and 4 readings at this time, but you should read the abstracts so you are able to generate a list of shared themes.
Let?s break down your progression towards this goal:
Module Activities Associated Article(s)
Module 1 Read ONE article Johansson, M. (2007). Historiography and psychoanalysis.?International Forum of Psychoanalysis,?16(2), 103?112.
Module 2 Read TWO articles Hebbrecht, M. (2013). The dream as a picture of the psychoanalytic process.?Romanian Journal of Psychoanalysis,?6(2), 123?142.

Perera, S. B. (2013). Circling, dreaming, aging.?Psychological Perspectives,?56(2), 137?148.
Prepare an ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY of the THREE articles that you read in Modules 1 and 2 Hebbrecht, M. (2013). The dream as a picture of the psychoanalytic process.?Romanian Journal of Psychoanalysis,?6(2), 123?142.

Johansson, M. (2007). Historiography and psychoanalysis.?International Forum of Psychoanalysis,?16(2), 103?112.

Perera, S. B. (2013). Circling, dreaming, aging.?Psychological Perspectives,?56(2), 137?148.
Skim (read the abstracts) of the articles assigned in Modules 3 and 4 Kluners, M. (2014). Freud as a philosopher of history.?The Journal of Psychohistory,?42(1), 55?71.

Newirth, J. (2014, May 5). Psychoanalysis’ past, present, and future: Sherlock Holmes, Sir Lancelot, and the Wizard of Oz.?Psychoanalytic Psychology, 1?14. Advance online publication.

Schut, A. J., & Castonguay, L. G. (2001). Reviving Freud’s vision of a psychoanalytic science: Implications for clinical training and education.Psychotherapy,?38(1), 40?49.

Summers, F. (2006). Freud’s relevance for contemporary psychoanalytic technique.?Psychoanalytic Psychology,?23(2), 327?338.
Prepare an OUTLINE of the common themes shared across ALL the assigned articles in Modules 1-4 Hebbrecht, M. (2013). The dream as a picture of the psychoanalytic process.?Romanian Journal of Psychoanalysis,?6(2), 123?142.

Johansson, M. (2007). Historiography and psychoanalysis.?International Forum of Psychoanalysis,?16(2), 103?112.

Kluners, M. (2014). Freud as a philosopher of history.?The Journal of Psychohistory,?42(1), 55?71.

Newirth, J. (2014, May 5). Psychoanalysis’ past, present, and future: Sherlock Holmes, Sir Lancelot, and the Wizard of Oz.?Psychoanalytic Psychology, 1?14. Advance online publication.

Perera, S. B. (2013). Circling, dreaming, aging.?Psychological Perspectives,?56(2), 137?148.

Schut, A. J., & Castonguay, L. G. (2001). Reviving Freud’s vision of a psychoanalytic science: Implications for clinical training and education.Psychotherapy,?38(1), 40?49.
Summers, F. (2006). Freud’s relevance for contemporary psychoanalytic technique.?Psychoanalytic Psychology,?23(2), 327?338.
Module 3 Read TWO articles Kluners, M. (2014). Freud as a philosopher of history.?The Journal of Psychohistory,?42(1), 55?71.

Schut, A. J., & Castonguay, L. G. (2001). Reviving Freud’s vision of a psychoanalytic science: Implications for clinical training and education.Psychotherapy,?38(1), 40?49.
Module 4 Read TWO articles Summers, F. (2006). Freud’s relevance for contemporary psychoanalytic technique.?Psychoanalytic Psychology,?23(2), 327?338.

Newirth, J. (2014, May 5). Psychoanalysis’ past, present, and future: Sherlock Holmes, Sir Lancelot, and the Wizard of Oz.?Psychoanalytic Psychology, 1?14. Advance online publication.
Utilize outline (created in Module 2) to prepare the SYNTHESIS PAPER Hebbrecht, M. (2013). The dream as a picture of the psychoanalytic process.?Romanian Journal of Psychoanalysis,?6(2), 123?142.

Johansson, M. (2007). Historiography and psychoanalysis.?International Forum of Psychoanalysis,?16(2), 103?112.

Kluners, M. (2014). Freud as a philosopher of history.?The Journal of Psychohistory,?42(1), 55?71.
Newirth, J. (2014, May 5). Psychoanalysis’ past, present, and future: Sherlock Holmes, Sir Lancelot, and the Wizard of Oz.?Psychoanalytic Psychology, 1?14. Advance online publication.

Perera, S. B. (2013). Circling, dreaming, aging.?Psychological Perspectives,?56(2), 137?148.

Schut, A. J., & Castonguay, L. G. (2001). Reviving Freud’s vision of a psychoanalytic science: Implications for clinical training and education.Psychotherapy,?38(1), 40?49.

Summers, F. (2006). Freud’s relevance for contemporary psychoanalytic technique.?Psychoanalytic Psychology,?23(2), 327?338.
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Writing in APA Style
WARNING: I am a stickler for APA style….
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Much to the dismay of many learners, I really do watch for every period, comma, quote, indent, font, margin, spacing, etc, etc, etc. But, I promise you that I don’t do this for my own entertainment. I truly believe that if you can get into the habit of correct APA style early in your doctoral journey that it will make the process sooooooo much easier as you move forward. The value of APA style lies in:
reducing cognitive demands on the reader – If you write in proper style, the reader doesn’t have to think about any of the mechanics of your writing and is free to focus all their energy on processing the intellectual contributions of your work.
promoting ongoing research – The utilization of APA style citations and references ensure that others can track back to see the progression of knowledge. You MUST ensure that you provide adequate information that others are able to work backwards to locate the source material from which your own writing is based.
promoting communication and collaboration in the field – The value of clear writing cannot be overstated! If you write in a clear, concise, easy-to-read style then you are more likely to be published and referenced. Do not let poor writing get in the way of your ability to share your knowledge with the larger academic community.
With this in mind, I would like to point you to a few GCU resources that you are encouraged to take advantage of if you are struggling with your writing:
GCU Doctoral Writing Tutor – http://dc.gcu.edu/writing (if you do not yet have access to the DC Network, you can email the writing tutor at docwritingtutor@gcu.edu)
GCU Writing Center – http://www.gcu.edu/Current-Students/Learning-Resources/Center-for-Learning-and-Advancement/Writing-Center.php
GCU Center for Learning and Advancement – http://www.gcu.edu/Current-Students/Learning-Resources/Center-for-Learning-and-Advancement.php
GCU CIRT Writing – http://cirt.gcu.edu/teaching/resources/sswriting
GCU CIRT APA Style – http://cirt.gcu.edu/teaching/resources/apa
Please, please, please, PLEEEEEAAAAASSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSEEE take advantage of these services. There is no such thing as a perfect writer. All of us can improve in our writing and become more effective scholarly communicators. The more you work on your writing, the easier it becomes and the more cognitive energy you have available to invest in the intellectual work of your project.
Whew… time for me to step off my soap box!
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