What’s your reaction to John Major’s campaign slogan: ”If you’ve got nothing to hide, you’ve got nothing to fear” as a magic bullet against crime and terrorism? Should we care about safe-guarding our privacy if we have nothing to hide?

Tavani, chap 7

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Panopticon, from Rosen:

Jeremy Bentham imagined the social benefits of a ring-shaped “inspection-house,” in which prisoners could be subject to constant surveillance. In the center of the courtyard would be an inspection tower with windows facing the inner wall of the ring. Supervisors in the central tower could observe every movement of the inhabitants of the cells, who were illuminated by natural lighting, but Venetian blinds would ensure that the supervisors could not be seen by the inhabitants. The uncertainty about whether or not they were being surveilled would deter the inhabitants from antisocial behavior. Michel Foucault described the purpose of the Panopticon — to induce in the inmate a state of conscious and permanent visibility that assures the automatic functioning of power.”   See Tavani p. 375

Extension of panopticon

Panopticon had limits in terms of:

1. method of surveillance– primarily visual

2. population subject to surveillance– inmates

3. context of surveillance– total institution

4. purpose– management of inmates

Foucault predicted that the panopticon would spread throughout the social fabric and become the defining characteristic of the modern age.

How has it been extended in regard to the 4 characteristics listed above?

Give two examples.  Write the answers in your journal.

New technologies

New technologies

1. communication surveillance (e.g., wiretapping)

2. computer surveillance (e.g., Clipper Chip, CAPPS II, NSA, TIA, Patriot Act and pen registers)

3. physical surveillance (Cameras, face-recognition, biometrics, xray)

How much further?

· constant visual surveillance in homes

· total communication and computer surveillance

· embedded identity/GPS chip

· neuro interface to monitor aggression levels with cut-off switch

· genetic programming to disallow hostility

· expansion to cover other forms of deviance

Answer in journal:    What is the NSA?

                              Who is Edward Snowdon?

                              How did the Patriot Act extend surveillance in the United States?

Surveillance and Privacy

Glenn Greenwald:  https://www.ted.com/talks/glenn_greenwald_why_privacy_matters#t-1097647

Watchful State Rosen

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Answer the questions in your journal based on the reading for today:

1.  In what ways can SHU (or any university) be compared to a Panopticon? (Think programs like TurnitIn.com used to checked for plagiarism)

2. According to Rosen why is the American view on privacy and surveillance so different than the British view?

3. What’s your reaction to John Major’s campaign slogan: ”If you’ve got nothing to hide, you’ve got nothing to fear” as a magic bullet against crime and terrorism? Should we care about safe-guarding our privacy if we have nothing to hide?

Surveillance Exercise

 

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In your journal:  Apply the three ethical theories to take a position  ” for”  or   “against”    this scenario: A mother is concerned about her 16 year old daughter and her internet activities, Facebook profile and friends, etc.  Without telling her daughter, she places surveillance software on her daughter’s laptop and regularly monitors her in this way.

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